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The catacombs of paris

The Catacombs of Paris are underground ossuaries in Paris, France, which hold the remains of more than six million people in a small part of a tunnel network built to consolidate Paris’ ancient stone mines.

MAKING SPACE FOR THE DEAD: CATACOMBS, CEMETERIES, AND THE REIMAGINING OF PARIS, 1780–1830 HARDCOVER – APRIL 15, 2019
by Erin-Marie Legacey  (Author)

The dead of Paris, before the French Revolution, were most often consigned to mass graveyards that contemporaries described as terrible and terrifying, emitting “putrid miasmas” that were a threat to both health and dignity. In a book that is at once wonderfully macabre and exceptionally informative, Erin-Marie Legacey explores how a new burial culture emerged in Paris as a result of both revolutionary fervor and public health concerns, resulting in the construction of park-like cemeteries on the outskirts of the city and a vast underground ossuary.

Making Space for the Dead describes how revolutionaries placed the dead at the center of their republican project of radical reinvention of French society and envisioned a future where graveyards would do more than safely contain human remains; they would serve to educate and inspire the living. Legacey unearths the unexpectedly lively process by which burial sites were reimagined, built, and used, focusing on three of the most important of these new spaces: the Paris Catacombs, Père Lachaise cemetery, and the short-lived Museum of French Monuments. By situating discussions of death and memory in the nation’s broader cultural and political context, as well as highlighting how ordinary Parisians understood and experienced these sites, she shows how the treatment of the dead became central to the reconstruction of Parisian society after the Revolution.

– Dr Alim Bey (explains ritual sacrifice)Historical References

The Catacombs of Rome
– The Catacombs of Rome (Italian: Catacombe di Roma) are ancient catacombs, underground burial places under Rome, Italy, of which there are at least forty, some discovered only in recent decades. … The Etruscans, like many other European peoples, used to bury their dead in underground chambers.

The Churches and Catacombs of Early Christian Rome: A Comprehensive Guide
by Matilda Webb (Author)

A comprehensive and important guide to the individual churches, catacombs, embellishments and artifacts of Early Christian Rome, this book covers a period from the first-century visits of the Apostles Peter and Paul to the end of the ninth-century Carolingian Renaissance. It describes precisely where the extant Early Christian features are situated and provides vital details on what can be seen. The accurate ground plan of each site studied enables the reader to locate features with ease and to appreciate the contrasting proportions and architectural development of each church.

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